OBS video recording stuttering and freezing

Jam Swoosh

New Member
Hello! Please could somebody help me with this issue. Basically I've been trying to record games recently at 1080p 60fps, however, I notice when I go back in the recording that the video seems to stutter (basically it looks like the frame rate decreases for a couple of seconds) and at some point the videos freeze (I noticed this once, it froze for about 3 seconds). I don't know why this is, I was playing Portal 1 & Portal 2, and I had no problems at all in game, it's just the recording. Unfortunately I didn't see when the video froze if OBS said anything on my second monitor, such as an encoding issue.

I've tried watching many people's videos on best settings but unfortunately I still have the same problem.

If anyone could help me with this I'd greatly appreciate it, thank you :)

I've attached my log file from recording, hope this helps:
 

Attachments

  • 2021-01-10 19-33-17.txt
    16 KB · Views: 76

Robtiel

New Member
you have to run obs as Admin. Try this and then start reording. It may helps increase the quality of the GPU render. Also try to set the ingame frame rate to 120fps or 240fps... its easier for the downscaling if its a clean devide
 

FerretBomb

Active Member
Robtiel is correct. When you run an application as admin it gives it priority when resources are being allocated. If this alone does not work you can try and use a program like Process Explorer to increase the priority of OBS.
This is not strictly accurate. Running as Admin allows OBS to implement a GPU-priority workaround developed in conjunction with Microsoft to ensure that OBS gets first access to GPU time to handle its housekeeping tasks before other applications can use it all. This is NOT an effect of simply running any process as Admin.
The kind of stutter this can fix is when 'frames skipped due to rendering lag' shows up in the logs. It is not present in this case, and while still a good idea to do, does not really apply here.

20:19:05.414: [jim-nvenc: 'recording_h264'] settings:
20:19:05.414: rate_control: CBR
20:19:05.414: bitrate: 16000
Do not record locally using CBR. CBR is required for use while livestreaming due to the infrastructure needs involved, but is a TERRIBLE option in any other case (like recording locally). Use CQP or CRF, which are quality-target based encoding methods that use as little or as much bitrate as is needed to maintain a given image quality level, which you can do while recording to a local disk instead of having to deal with the livestreaming network bandwidth bottleneck.

20:19:05.414: lookahead: true
20:19:05.414: psycho_aq: true
THIS is very likely the actual culprit. DISABLE both Lookahead and Psychovisual Tuning. They use CUDA cores, and from my experience just cause problems in many cases when using NVENC, most commonly causing 'frames skipped due to encoding lag'. Which IS present in the logfile, though in very small numbers.

20:19:05.445: [ffmpeg muxer: 'adv_file_output'] Writing file 'C:/Users/User/Videos/2021-01-10 20-19-05.mp4'
NEVER RECORD DIRECTLY TO MP4 FOR ANY REASON.
It is NOT a recording-safe format, so if ANYTHING goes wrong during the recording or finalization, it will become irrecoverably corrupted. Only thing you can do is delete it, there is NO working option to recover or reconstruct a failed MP4. As an added bonus, most video editors have major problems with the native-mp4 recordings that OBS produces, but work fine if you record to MKV and then use the 'Remux Recordings' option under the File menu to remux them to MP4s.
There's a reason it pops up an orange warning message when selected, which everyone ignores.
 

Jam Swoosh

New Member
Thanks so much for your help. I'll try those things. Reason why these settings were on was because of somebody's video. What should the CQ level be?
 

FerretBomb

Active Member
Thanks so much for your help. I'll try those things. Reason why these settings were on was because of somebody's video. What should the CQ level be?
Depends on what you mean to do with it. General use, 18-23 is pretty much fine. 16 is good quality. 12 if you plan to edit and re-encode it later, which can help to minimize artifacting after the double-encode. Lower is better-quality, but don't go below 12 unless you have a specific reason. Files get gigantic FAST, for virtually no visual quality improvement.

Also, thanks for stopping by the stream earlier! I did see you and your message about the thread here, but was scatterbrained at the time and got distracted by in-game stuff. D:
 
Last edited:
Top