Unstable Bitrate

Isma09921

New Member
Hello, I have a problem when I want to stream when I start the transmission the bitrate begins to vary, but in an exaggerated way, I have 100 mbps of download and 10 mbps of upload, the bitrate goes from 4000, 4000 and something to 6000, 5000, 3000 even sometimes up to 1000 and so it varies. Some will probably say that it is because of the number of megabytes of upload I have, but this is a problem that started a few days ago . Before this problem did not occur to me and I could stream well at 1920 x 1080 at 6000 kbps or lower qualities, now I think it must even be difficult for me to stream at 720 to 4500 kbps, I do not know why this happens, warning that I tried with other programs to stream such as streamlabs, Twitch studio, action! And it also happens to me in those programs, if someone can help me with this problem, I would appreciate it, I have fiber optics and ethernet cable . Here is a screenshot of an internet speed test I have and the url of the obs diagnostic log file . I hope you can help me please. I don't know if the text is well written, because I am from Argentina and I used an internet translator, I hope it is understood

Captura de pantalla 2024-07-07 201314.png


 

qhobbes

Active Member
1. The Hardware-accelerated GPU scheduling ("HAGS") feature in Windows is currently known to cause performance and capture issues with OBS, games and overlay tools. It's an experimental feature and we recommend disabling it via this screen or these instructions.
2. Your log contains streaming sessions with dropped frames. This can only be caused by a failure in your internet connection or your networking hardware. It is not caused by OBS but OBS can help. Follow the troubleshooting steps at: Dropped Frames and General Connection Issues. What you are describing is dynamic bitrate but your log doesn't show it enabled, instead there's dropped frames. Before you start streaming, Settings > Advanced > Network > Enable Dynamic Bitrate, [Apply], [OK]. Then start dreaming. It either dynamic bitrate or dropped frames.
 

Tomasz Góral

Active Member
where does winrtm appear? , and what is that ?
Your provider is connected with other, and other and other, you don't have direct connect with server (e.g. Twitch or YT), soo some times some provider has network problems and you see disconnect on stream. WinMTR is program to check routers from you network to target server (must know ip or domain name).
 

Isma09921

New Member
Your provider is connected with other, and other and other, you don't have direct connect with server (e.g. Twitch or YT), soo some times some provider has network problems and you see disconnect on stream. WinMTR is program to check routers from you network to target server (must know ip or domain name).
It makes sense that I don't have a direct connection to the Twitch and Youtube servers, because I tried streaming on both pages and it gave me that bitrate error, how could I solve it? Should I talk to my internet providers about this? Or is it something I could do?
 

Lawrence_SoCal

Active Member
how could I solve it? Should I talk to my internet providers about this? Or is it something I could do?
See articles and links already posted by @qhobbes
This is for you to research... 99% of ISP Providers will do a basic check (for most consumers, whose priority is download traffic, and see your system has a connection and call it a day).
If the issue is on their end (and it usually isn't) you are going to have to provide solid research indicating the issue (in detailed network terms... yes this means you are going to have to get a quick education on networking)

Most likely, in doing basic troubleshooting, you'll find the issue is your OBS Studio computer (Operating System config, or related) or OBS Studio settings related to your hardware capabilities; or competing other LAN traffic; or router/gateway traffic and or settings

Your CPU is old (at 7 generations), but as @qhobbes noted, your OBS Studio logs shows no encoder overload, so other Operating System background processes impacting network traffic? (like hte HAGS setting?) or other traffic on your PC or LAN?
follow the directions already provided, make the appropriate changes, and test again. Posting a new log after the changes is issue persists, and posting what network troubleshooting you did, and what you found
 

Isma09921

New Member
See articles and links already posted by @qhobbes
This is for you to research... 99% of ISP Providers will do a basic check (for most consumers, whose priority is download traffic, and see your system has a connection and call it a day).
If the issue is on their end (and it usually isn't) you are going to have to provide solid research indicating the issue (in detailed network terms... yes this means you are going to have to get a quick education on networking)

Most likely, in doing basic troubleshooting, you'll find the issue is your OBS Studio computer (Operating System config, or related) or OBS Studio settings related to your hardware capabilities; or competing other LAN traffic; or router/gateway traffic and or settings

Your CPU is old (at 7 generations), but as @qhobbes noted, your OBS Studio logs shows no encoder overload, so other Operating System background processes impacting network traffic? (like hte HAGS setting?) or other traffic on your PC or LAN?
follow the directions already provided, make the appropriate changes, and test again. Posting a new log after the changes is issue persists, and posting what network troubleshooting you did, and what you found
Hello, I disabled the hardware accelerated GPU programming and started some stream tests in obs with the bandwidth test mode and it still gives me the bitrate problem, here is the link with the obs log after doing the test and have disabled hardware accelerated gpu programming


 

Lawrence_SoCal

Active Member
you should be watching hardware resource utilization in real-time... if your CPU is spiking to 100% and staying there... that's bad
the noise filter can be CPU intensive... turn it off for testing purposes for now.. if you find a stable state with OBS Studio, get a performance snapshot before and after enabling so you see the CPU impact that one change makes before deciding if ok to keep using on such an old computer for this type of work
- Your 7th gen Intel CPU is more than capable, for someone with significant technical expertise at Operating System (OS) and OBS Studio with a non-sophisticated/demanding setting and workload ... not so much if you don't have a REALLY good handle on all of your background OS processes, other traffic on your LAN [like others (family/roommates/friends/whatever) web conferencing (or other upload traffic) at same time, or unexpected WiFi usage consuming WAN upload bandwidth? ]...
- You need to figure out how to log into your Router/gateway/firewall and get some real-time usage statistics. And then be able to identify traffic sources. And then correlate that with your streaming. do NOT expect to be able use 100% of what you think your WAN upload bandwidth limit is
 

qhobbes

Active Member
You need to enable Dynamic Bitrate. Before you start streaming, Settings > Advanced > Network > enable Dynamic Bitrate, [Apply], [OK]. Then start dreaming.
 

Isma09921

New Member
It's not the idea. If I activate the dynamic bitrate I do not lose fps, but the bitrate remains unstable and harms the quality and details of the images
 

qhobbes

Active Member
Download the TwitchTest from https://r1ch.net/projects/twitchtest and pick a server that has 100 quality.
If that doesn't fix it, create a free restream.io account, connect restream.io to your Twitch account and then connect OBS to restream.io
If that doesn't fix it, try another service such as Facebook or YouTube.

You have a few options:
1. Continue to stream at 6000 video and 160 audio without dynamic bitrate and drop frames when ever you don't have 6160 kbps of bandwidth.
2. Stream with dynamic bitrate and not drop frames but have lower quality frames.
3. Check your log from your streaming session with dynamic bitrate, set your bitrate to the lowest value from that log and then adjust output resolution and FPS as necessary.

If you're concerned about quality, you really should be steaming at 720p 60 FPS or 1080p 30 FPS. YouTube recommends 12,000 kbps for 1080p 60 FPS streams with h264.
 

Isma09921

New Member
Download the TwitchTest from https://r1ch.net/projects/twitchtest and pick a server that has 100 quality.
If that doesn't fix it, create a free restream.io account, connect restream.io to your Twitch account and then connect OBS to restream.io
If that doesn't fix it, try another service such as Facebook or YouTube.

You have a few options:
1. Continue to stream at 6000 video and 160 audio without dynamic bitrate and drop frames when ever you don't have 6160 kbps of bandwidth.
2. Stream with dynamic bitrate and not drop frames but have lower quality frames.
3. Check your log from your streaming session with dynamic bitrate, set your bitrate to the lowest value from that log and then adjust output resolution and FPS as necessary.

If you're concerned about quality, you really should be steaming at 720p 60 FPS or 1080p 30 FPS. YouTube recommends 12,000 kbps for 1080p 60 FPS streams with h264.
More than worried about the quality, I am worried about the fact of being able to stream, if you were in my situation you would understand me. I could stream well, with this old PC as they say, I don't think it's a hardware issue. I could stream decently, without decreasing the bitrate or resolution. What I want is for the bitrate to be stable again, nothing more, and how is that done? , I don't know . That's why I asked here. It must be something with my internet, I already tried restream and the bitrate is still the same
 

Isma09921

New Member
Maybe I was wrong when I posted the problem on this forum. Because it may be more of a problem with the internet than with the obs program itself.
But well, I didn't know where else, and I thought that maybe they could help me, without calling the technicians from the internet company I use.
 

qhobbes

Active Member
I was in your situation. I streamed 1080p 30 FPS (such as this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBeoQqCLHzg ) from a business with a 5.5 mbps upload connection that was shared with the customers with a 10 year old (at the time) processor. I remember manually changing the bitrate (maybe mid-steam or stopping and starting, i forget, that was awhile ago) to prevent dropped frames; it got old fast. I had to pick between dropped frames or the occasional lower quality frames and I went with lower quality because IMO those are better than nothing and the viewers may think it's a bandwidth issue on their end. I set the bitrate at 6,000, enabled dynamic bitrate and just let it ride.
 

Lawrence_SoCal

Active Member
Because it may be more of a problem with the internet than with the obs program itself.
correct, though semantics matter as it means something to those more technical than yourself. You have a data network throughput problem. That could be the Internet provider.... OR... something on your local network (LAN). And the vast majority of Internet providers (ISPs) won't troubleshoot/diagnose your LAN.

You wouldn't happen to be using a cellular ISP or other wireless Internet connection technology, would you? I presume no, as you mentioned fiber optics, but most fiber optic ISP connection provide WAY more than 10mbps upload speed. Hopefully you weren't mislead by a coax cable provider calling their system 'powered by fiber optics' but not actually having a fiber optics cable to your house (FTTH) [FYI, that is what I have]. If fiber optics to the node (ie serving lots of houses via COAX (can also provides TV channels), then fiber really isn't relevant to anything)

But well, I didn't know where else, and I thought that maybe they could help me, without calling the technicians from the internet company I use.
real-time video compositing (what OBS Studio does) is computationally demanding. And getting that to work on under-powered gear (which is what you have) is even harder/trickier. Doable, WITH technical expertise.

What is not adequate is 'thinking' your hardware isn't the issue.. you must use scientific method, isolate variables, test and KNOW. otherwise you doing the equivalent of driving blindfolded... sorry to be blunt, but you seem to be searching for an easy magic button to fix your issues. there really isn't one.. the fix may be small/simple, but finding a solution (if one exists) will require technical troubleshooting. There are MANY possibilities, and some of them will cause more harm than good to test if they aren't your actual problem.

The issue is simple, either
- your PC is got an issue preventing it from sustaining a given bitrate... but as log only shows network issue, there is a possibility at Operating System level something is going on, but I wouldn't spend more time on this until I better understand network traffic
leaving
- either ISP upload bandwidth isn't stable (a possibility, but not as common) OR something other than OBS Studio is using the upload bandwidth. This could include data backup/sync processes, and lots of other possibilities, on your PC, or other devices on LAN.

What upload bandwidth should you have? is that bandwidth being shared with others?
Is there ANYTHING else connected to your LAN (smart and/or mobile devices, video doorbells, 'smart' thermostat, etc)? is WiFi enabled?
 

Isma09921

New Member
correct, though semantics matter as it means something to those more technical than yourself. You have a data network throughput problem. That could be the Internet provider.... OR... something on your local network (LAN). And the vast majority of Internet providers (ISPs) won't troubleshoot/diagnose your LAN.

You wouldn't happen to be using a cellular ISP or other wireless Internet connection technology, would you? I presume no, as you mentioned fiber optics, but most fiber optic ISP connection provide WAY more than 10mbps upload speed. Hopefully you weren't mislead by a coax cable provider calling their system 'powered by fiber optics' but not actually having a fiber optics cable to your house (FTTH) [FYI, that is what I have]. If fiber optics to the node (ie serving lots of houses via COAX (can also provides TV channels), then fiber really isn't relevant to anything)


real-time video compositing (what OBS Studio does) is computationally demanding. And getting that to work on under-powered gear (which is what you have) is even harder/trickier. Doable, WITH technical expertise.

What is not adequate is 'thinking' your hardware isn't the issue.. you must use scientific method, isolate variables, test and KNOW. otherwise you doing the equivalent of driving blindfolded... sorry to be blunt, but you seem to be searching for an easy magic button to fix your issues. there really isn't one.. the fix may be small/simple, but finding a solution (if one exists) will require technical troubleshooting. There are MANY possibilities, and some of them will cause more harm than good to test if they aren't your actual problem.

The issue is simple, either
- your PC is got an issue preventing it from sustaining a given bitrate... but as log only shows network issue, there is a possibility at Operating System level something is going on, but I wouldn't spend more time on this until I better understand network traffic
leaving
- either ISP upload bandwidth isn't stable (a possibility, but not as common) OR something other than OBS Studio is using the upload bandwidth. This could include data backup/sync processes, and lots of other possibilities, on your PC, or other devices on LAN.

What upload bandwidth should you have? is that bandwidth being shared with others?
Is there ANYTHING else connected to your LAN (smart and/or mobile devices, video doorbells, 'smart' thermostat, etc)? is WiFi enabled?
I see that you are treating me like an ignorant person. It's not that I speak for nothing. If I say what I say it is for a reason. I tried changing the ethernet cable and putting it in another computer and the bitrate is still unstable. I tried formatting and changing the windows operating system 3 times, so I discard the software and hardware. As you said, there is no overload on the CPU to encode, even if the processor is from a somewhat old generation. I don't see that it is a hardware problem. I know the difference between a fiber optic cable and the connector. You could have a little more respect
 

Isma09921

New Member
correct, though semantics matter as it means something to those more technical than yourself. You have a data network throughput problem. That could be the Internet provider.... OR... something on your local network (LAN). And the vast majority of Internet providers (ISPs) won't troubleshoot/diagnose your LAN.

You wouldn't happen to be using a cellular ISP or other wireless Internet connection technology, would you? I presume no, as you mentioned fiber optics, but most fiber optic ISP connection provide WAY more than 10mbps upload speed. Hopefully you weren't mislead by a coax cable provider calling their system 'powered by fiber optics' but not actually having a fiber optics cable to your house (FTTH) [FYI, that is what I have]. If fiber optics to the node (ie serving lots of houses via COAX (can also provides TV channels), then fiber really isn't relevant to anything)


real-time video compositing (what OBS Studio does) is computationally demanding. And getting that to work on under-powered gear (which is what you have) is even harder/trickier. Doable, WITH technical expertise.

What is not adequate is 'thinking' your hardware isn't the issue.. you must use scientific method, isolate variables, test and KNOW. otherwise you doing the equivalent of driving blindfolded... sorry to be blunt, but you seem to be searching for an easy magic button to fix your issues. there really isn't one.. the fix may be small/simple, but finding a solution (if one exists) will require technical troubleshooting. There are MANY possibilities, and some of them will cause more harm than good to test if they aren't your actual problem.

The issue is simple, either
- your PC is got an issue preventing it from sustaining a given bitrate... but as log only shows network issue, there is a possibility at Operating System level something is going on, but I wouldn't spend more time on this until I better understand network traffic
leaving
- either ISP upload bandwidth isn't stable (a possibility, but not as common) OR something other than OBS Studio is using the upload bandwidth. This could include data backup/sync processes, and lots of other possibilities, on your PC, or other devices on LAN.

What upload bandwidth should you have? is that bandwidth being shared with others?
Is there ANYTHING else connected to your LAN (smart and/or mobile devices, video doorbells, 'smart' thermostat, etc)? is WiFi enabled?

That cable that is in my router, isn't it fiber optic? . Sorry for being a bit aggressive, but first you could have asked why I said what I said, why I think it might be the internet and not the hardware.
 
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