Question / Help Can OBS record multiple video tracks?

keybounce

Member
Can OBS record multiple video tracks?

Specifically, can the webcam and screen capture be recorded separately, so that they can be mixed in an editor?

This is different from streaming, where they get mixed into one video stream. Just like a stream gets one audio feed, but I am told that recording can record audio feeds separately, can the same be done with video?

NB: Camtasia, a video editor, can work with recordings that have separate screen recordings and webcam tracks, but it is using a custom recording format. I don't know if mp4/mkv/mov recording formats normally can hold two video streams.
 

ahmed own

New Member
What if i said i don it before (But take so much PC power and need more work each time you don it)

1. Open OBS Studio.
2. Sitting > hotkeys > Gave Start recording and Stop recording nice Hotkey (I use Ctrl+Shift+S and Ctrl+Shift+D)
3. Close then Open OBS Studio.
4. Open OBS Studio Again (Now you have 2 OBS Studio)
5. in the first OBS Go to sitting > Output > Recording > Select recording path
6. in the 2nd OBS Go to sitting > Output > Recording > Select recording path "Gave it another name"
Ex : Rec\FaceCame and Rec\GamePlay
7. Start the game and press Ctrl+Shift+S or the hotkey you pick

You can do that without steps : 2,3,4,7 Just open OBS twice, but these way the 2 videos will start the same time and sync them will not take any work.

You need to have two paths because If the two OBS Start the same time the 2 files name will be the same.

Take so much CPU Power

When you close the OBS, the OBS will remember only one path

I didn't do these for long time, if you want to ask any thing go to my channel and post in the Discussion

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWkl9PLDpT9CNgx4_THtZMw/undefined
 

keybounce

Member
Two copies of OBS, recording two different video files, with the same hot keys to sync the start/stops?

I gotta give that a try, thank you. (May have to put both of them at ultra-fast, but it's worth a try)
 

Plazma_Storm

New Member
This is a very old thread to be sure, but for anyone who finds their way here, the best way to solve this issue, in my opinion, is to set OBS to record a canvas space of 3840X1080. You can place your webcam as a full sized object in one of the two halves and still get a full 1080p video of whatever you were recording along with the webcam (a lets play video for example). you can then open this , admittedly large file, in a video editor and cut the video in half, this will allow you to move your webcam footage around the other portion of the screen at will during editing, so that it does not obstruct anything important. Once you have cut the two pieces apart, you can resize your webcam footage as desired and after re-positioning it where you want it in your lets play footage, you can crop out the black space leaving you with a single 1080p video, but with what is essentially (for editing purposes) two video tracks, which should both be perfectly synchronized right away so that even if you trim the video (whose single video track links your two videos) you don't have to mess with trying to make sure they get re-synced together afterward.

At this level of encoding, you will put quite a strain on a single graphics card if you use it to encode your video as well as have it process the graphics for your game. Because many gamers put a premium on keeping their case cool, your best options are to either: Encode the video at the software level (uses a large chunk of CPU power, so you'll need a powerful CPU), or have a second, not necessarily super powerful, graphics card that is used only to encode the video (OBS does support using a different graphics card than the one doing video output as the encoder, you just have to fiddle with the encoding settings). If you use an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 for gaming, for example, you could likely get away with having a 1050, or perhaps something even less powerful, doing the encode on the video, as this process is not nearly as strenuous on the card as drawing, and displaying a video game's graphics in their higher settings. Having said this, you would need something similar in power to your primary card, if you were recording the game footage in 4K, as there is much more data being input into the encoder at that resolution. and while the output video will be at 1080p, the original video was 4K, and the encoder has to compress and encode a lot more into that space than it usually would.

As a final option, which is what most of us had to do up to this point, you can record the "webcam" footage on a GoPro, or other camcorder with removable/transferable digital storage, and then edit them into a single saved video, doing this will require you to do your best to sync the two videos up with one another, which is very tricky to do. The best way to sync these two separate objects up is to have voice audio recorded as a separate track from the game audio on the game footage, then sync your voice up in the two videos and disable the vocal audio from whichever source sounds less appealing.
 
Last edited:

3Dz

New Member
This is a very old thread to be sure, but for anyone who finds their way here, the best way to solve this issue, in my opinion, is to set OBS to record a canvas space of 3840X1080. You can place your webcam as a full sized object in one of the two halves and still get a full 1080p video of whatever you were recording along with the webcam (a lets play video for example). you can then open this , admittedly large file, in a video editor and cut the video in half, this will allow you to move your webcam footage around the other portion of the screen at will during editing, so that it does not obstruct anything important. Once you have cut the two pieces apart, you can resize your webcam footage as desired and after re-positioning it where you want it in your lets play footage, you can crop out the black space leaving you with a single 1080p video, but with what is essentially (for editing purposes) two video tracks, which should both be perfectly synchronized right away so that even if you trim the video (whose single video track links your two videos) you don't have to mess with trying to make sure they get re-synced together afterward.

At this level of encoding, you will put quite a strain on a single graphics card if you use it to encode your video as well as have it process the graphics for your game. Because many gamers put a premium on keeping their case cool, your best options are to either: Encode the video at the software level (uses a large chunk of CPU power, so you'll need a powerful CPU), or have a second, not necessarily super powerful, graphics card that is used only to encode the video (OBS does support using a different graphics card than the one doing video output as the encoder, you just have to fiddle with the encoding settings). If you use an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 for gaming, for example, you could likely get away with having a 1050, or perhaps something even less powerful, doing the encode on the video, as this process is not nearly as strenuous on the card as drawing, and displaying a video game's graphics in their higher settings. Having said this, you would need something similar in power to your primary card, if you were recording the game footage in 4K, as there is much more data being input into the encoder at that resolution. and while the output video will be at 1080p, the original video was 4K, and the encoder has to compress and encode a lot more into that space than it usually would.

As a final option, which is what most of us had to do up to this point, you can record the "webcam" footage on a GoPro, or other camcorder with removable/transferable digital storage, and then edit them into a single saved video, doing this will require you to do your best to sync the two videos up with one another, which is very tricky to do. The best way to sync these two separate objects up is to have voice audio recorded as a separate track from the game audio on the game footage, then sync your voice up in the two videos and disable the vocal audio from whichever source sounds less appealing.
I found out how to change the canvas size in Settings->Video. Unfortunately, the ginormous canvas size you mention isn't one of the choices in the pull-down menu. Is there some add-on that allows this, or was this just a part of an earlier release that was eliminated?

I have two things I want to do with the two video outputs:
I want a large canvas video that I can use to span two monitors, giving me a dual monitor view.
I would like to figure out how to take two cameras and aim them to make a 3D video that is later viewed so that the two side-by-side video images are fed to each eye independently. I have seen 3D videos that are clearly just the two "eyes" of the two cameras placed side-by-side. If I knew what the standard sizes and proportions of these were, I could ask OBS to put the two images from my two cameras adjacent like this and have a "hacked together" 3D video that would play properly on the cell phone in a viewfinder type facemasks.
 
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